By hook or cook: Finding a new recipe for happiness in the kitchen

Bunny has got a new love in her life, and i’m not at all jealous.  Because her new-found love is not a person but a pot.

Or, to be exact, an Instant Pot.  The Instant Pot – the brainchild of a Chinese-Canadian who’s become a zillionaire thanks to his invention – is a device which performs seven different cookery functions, and can make everything from bread to biryani, curd to casseroles.

Thanks to the Instant Pot, Bunny has rediscovered the joys of cooking.  And she’s not the only one.  Across the world, in India and abroad, more and more people – men as well as women, with or without an Instant Pot – are taking up cooking, not as a daily chore which has to be performed to put daal-roti on the table, but as a creative hobby.

In an age of fast foods and home delivery-pizza, the culinary art – and it is nothing short of an art – of making food that is not only healthy and nutritious but tastes as good as it looks is making a welcome comeback.

Indeed, the kitchen has become a means – or should that be meals?  – of international communication. Like millions of other home chefs, Bunny is in constant touch with people all over the country and the world exchanging recipes and tips on various methods of cooking.

This contributes in large part to the enjoyment to be derived from cookery: the emotionally satisfying feeling that you belong to a community of like-minded people, spread across the globe, with whom you exchange notes on how to do any of the countless magical things which can turn the fodder of raw ingredients into an ambrosial feast for the taste buds.

Like the ability to sing or play a musical instrument, skill in cooking is an expression of generosity in that it gives pleasure not only to the person performing the act but to the others being treated to the result.  Which is why i admire and applaud all those who make cookery part of their raison d’etre.  Or, more appropriately, their rasoi d’etre.

DISCLAIMER : Views expressed above are the author’s own.

Jug Suraiya

A former associate editor with the Times of India, Jug Suraiya writes two regular columns for the print edition, Jugular Vein, which appears every Friday, and Second Opinion, which appears on Wednesdays. His blog takes a contrarian view of topical and timeless issues, political, social, economic and speculative.
A former associate editor with the Times of India, Jug Suraiya writes two regular columns for the print edition, Jugular Vein, which appears every Friday, a. . .

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https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/blogs/jugglebandhi/by-hook-or-cook-finding-a-new-recipe-for-happiness-in-the-kitchen/